“The leader stood over all of us saying we had to call someone NOW and talk to them about Forever, and she was standing over us waiting for us to call.” – A new graduate speaks about her experience in Forever Living

Here we go…

Straight after I had graduated from university (STRAIGHT after), my
long-term friend joined Forever and was really excited about it. We
were really close at the time and spent a lot of time together, and I
trusted her completely. Somehow at that time I had never heard about
MLM at all let alone Forever, so it sounded quite good to me. A
business I could do from home while I looked for my first proper job
after uni? Perfect! She took me to the local Business Presentation and
I didn’t understand much of it but it looked super exciting. Lots of
smiley women around, lots of beauty products, it just looked to me
like I could have fun with a brand new friends and get a discount on
some awesome stuff. My friend told me the business training was worth
more than the £200 investment needed anyway and would help me
career-wise too, no matter what area I worked in. It sounds silly, but
this was the first I’d heard of anything like this and I was super
happy to join even though it was a LOT of money on my part-time
waitress wages.

“We had to contact everyone we knew about the company…”

I soon learnt we had to contact everyone we knew about the company and
ask them to join our team, in various scripted ways. I felt really
uncomfortable about this and would have rather sold the products
themselves or got people I didn’t know to join, but I was told it was
the only way, that I need to get motivated, etc. I was given links of
mindset training on Youtube and some motivational books to read very
day when i woke up. I was told to create a dream board of all the
things I wanted in life, and that other people’s opinions shouldn’t
mean more to me than the things on my dream board, so I shouldn’t be
hesitant to talk to anyone about the ‘opportunity’. I struck up a few
conversations with old friends and led them into talking about the
business. I felt deceitful and hoped they wouldn’t think I had only
spoken to them because I wanted them to join (I had in that instance,
but I did care about them too). No one signed up.

After my failure to create a team I was told to go round to the house
of someone who was very successful in Forever. There was a small group
of us newbies there, I was the youngest by a mile. The leader stood
over all of us saying we had to call someone NOW and talk to them
about Forever, and she was standing over us waiting for us to call.
Everyone else picked up their phone. I said I don’t actually call
anyone, I just message (no one I knew at my age randomly phoned their
friends anymore) so it would look weird. She closed off from me and
said I was making excuses, and that she couldn’t stand excuses. I
still didn’t want to call anyone and said I’d rather do things a
different way, and I tried to reassure her I really wanted to make
this work.

“I was already paying out for things I hadn’t expected…”

The leader told me if I really wanted to succeed I’d be at the next
official training event, which was too expensive for me and I didn’t
have transport to get there. I was already paying out for things I
hadn’t expected, having four monthly payments to access training and
so on (QLS group, Forever Knowledge, Forever 360 and Smart Pod). I was
told to ‘buy the ticket now and figure out how to get there later’,
which turned out to be a common phrase I heard a lot. To try to get in
everyone’s good graces again I borrowed money for this training event
(taking four train journeys on my own at the weekend), hoping it would
be enough to get some more help. In my Facebook group women were told
if they didn’t have a sick day off work or leave the kids with a
babysitter in order to attend training events they were losers who
made excuses and wouldn’t succeed. Mums often got stressed out with
the lack of time they now had with their kids but where told to ‘make
your kids the reason to succeed, not your excuse’ and to find them a
babysitter as it would all be worth it when they were living life like
a millionaire.

At the training event the leader came on stage to loads of applause
and cheers, like a celebrity. She told us we need to brand ourselves
and take lots of pictures and make our profiles public so everyone can
see how great our life is and want to join. She said yesterday she
posted about going out somewhere, but she actually didn’t go anywhere-
she took the picture of herself in the car a few days earlier and
posted in when we was still in bed feeling tired and ill, but no one
outside Forever needed to know that. She told us it doesn’t matter how
we feel, we need to make people want our lives, that’s what our job is
now.

By this stage my sponsor was basically unrecognisable from the girl I
once knew. All she talked about was Forever. When someone wasn’t
interested she said to me ‘no just means not right now’ and asked them
again next time she saw them. She gave my sister a face cream which
triggered a big allergic rash and pressurised her to keep using it ‘as
its just the toxins coming out’. My sister pretended she was using it
to shut her up but had to stop as it was so painful. Everyone my
sponsor knew who was not involved with Forever she fell out with as
they were ‘negative’ and she ‘needed only supportive positive people
in her life now’. She had quit her successful, well-paid job and was
staying at home all day, posting a perfect calm ideal life on Facebook
yet being crying and stressed when anyone close to her saw her.

“Only losers are employed…”

The mentality in Forever was that only losers are employed, and that
everyone who is smart and ambitious knows better than to take on a
full-time job. I was shamed into not getting a full-time job and it
got to the point where I saw it as a failure. This lasted four years
while I tried to do MLM alongside minimum wage part time jobs, ruining
my best job prospects straight after graduation, but I knew if I got a
‘proper’ career I would be looked down upon as weak, and I believed
people outside Forever would look down on me as a failure too.

I wanted to keep my work and personal life separate to hang on to the
tiny bit of respect my old friends had for me, but this made me be
seen by my Forever group as someone who was lazy and didn’t want to
work hard for success, which hurt me and make me want to prove myself.
My group had stopped talking to me and my sponsor got stressed and
said we needed to go contact marketing instead. I was told it was fun,
we would meet in the city centre and just be friendly and people would
naturally be curious about the business, that I was being paid to hang
out and shop, essentially. I was excited, thinking this is how I would
get my team without alienating the people close to me. I honestly
believed at that time, thanks to all the training, that recruiting
people was doing them a favour and saving them from their stressful
J.O.B.s which would give them miserable lives. We were told that every
time we didn’t approach someone about the business we were just being
selfish by not helping them, and didn’t we want to help people live to
their full potential? The first place we went was Boots. My sponsor
pointed out a lady looking at the shampoo and told me to go and talk
to her about our shampoo. I was shocked and said I couldn’t just go up
and do that, and that I didn’t know what to say. Suddenly my sponsor
got irate and shouted ‘talk to her NOW! With this attitude you’ll
never make manager!’ She didn’t seem to care that everyone heard us. I
was so embarrassed. The poor lady looked over to us in sheer confusion
and terror. My sponsor tried to carry on arguing, but I’d had enough
and walked out the store in sheer panic. My sponsor and long-term
friend stopped speaking to me after that and seemed to hate me. I
started to feel very humiliated and alone.

“My question kept getting passed between departments…”

I decided I was going to try and work the business online by myself,
and wanted to make a health blog talking about how wonderful our
products were, as I completely believed they were. I couldn’t find any
information about them apart from a short paragraph on the official
website, and needed a lot more information to sell them online
successfully. I messaged head office asking why the honey was so
expensive (even organic raw honey was a quarter of the price), why the
tea bags were so expensive, and so on. I honestly believed there was a
reason, and was excited to be able to explain it to people. My
question kept getting passed between departments and finally I
received a reply with a standard blurb about the products. I replied
back repeating my question about the difference in price, I wanted to
know why it was so much higher, what the quality differences were. The
answer was just that it was ‘high quality’. My emails were ignored
after that. I started I worry that the prices were inflated with no
reason. At this point a cloud of panic set in as I started to wonder
if I’d been duped all along. I was scared the dreams of a perfect life
and success I’d built up in my head were not going to happen after
all, and that the time I had spent on the company had been wasted when
I should have got a ‘real job’ after graduation as I’d planned and
studied for. This was a really horrible feeling and I tried to push it
away.

“I was terrified to think
anything negative or feel negative incase it made the thought real.”

 
I quit Forever but still felt MLM was the answer and didn’t want to
admit I had gone down the wrong path after all. I joined a couple of
other companies but after the initial excitement at everyone being
nice to me because I was new and trying out the products, they all
worked exactly the same underneath. I kept wasting my days at home by
myself watching mindset videos all day on Youtube as I kept being told
mindset was the reason I wasn’t succeeding. Everyone was talking about
the Secret and the Law of Attraction, and that the thoughts you have
control your life and create your reality. I was terrified to think
anything negative or feel negative incase it made the thought real. I
was told if you think you aren’t going to make it, then you won’t make
it, and for instance if you wake up and feel sad, it will cause sad
energy to be attracted to you and something bad will happen to cause
more sadness, so you had to be careful and always watch your thoughts.
You always had to remain grateful, patient and positive and to believe
you are already living your dream life right now, which will make it
more likely to happen. I couldn’t air any doubts with anyone otherwise
I was labelled as negative and causing my own problems.

I was tired out and had no friends left both inside and outside MLM
groups as I hadn’t been successful, and felt both groups saw me as a
failure in life. I had no money whatsoever (not even enough to buy a
bag of crisps on a whim) though I felt I was working every second of
every day and felt like a total loser, which hurt me as I was
naturally very ambitious and sociable with big plans for my life, and
had graduated with so much hope for my future. I also felt I couldn’t
admit I was lonely or poor as it would attract more loneliness and
lack of money to me, and that I needed to have an ‘abundance mindset’
and to carry on working hard. I believed success was always just
around the corner and soon I’d have my ideal life, friends again, a
business of my own and regular travel, like all the others I saw on
social media who were doing MLM. I honestly didn’t understand why I
hadn’t made it like they had, although from the outside maybe it
looked like I had too, due to all my inspirational posts.

If I just had a cup of tea for 5 mins I felt guilty as I should be
‘working’, and I didn’t want to go out and enjoy myself as I thought
this would mean I was being lazy and not working on my dreams hard
enough. I lost contact with almost everyone but thought it would all
be worth it one day. To cut a long story short, with absolutely no
exaggeration, this led to me having a full-blown panic attack as I
couldn’t stop the negative thoughts and was terrified I was making
them real. I then ended up having panic attacks every week. I
collapsed on the floor, felt like I couldn’t breathe and honestly
thought I would faint or die. I was exhausted and thought I was
actually going crazy. I developed obsessive compulsive disorder to try
and ‘control’ my thoughts and to stop bad things happening. My
boyfriend was very supportive and told me I needed to relax and get
away from all the stress and find a job so I could make regular money
and meet people again.

I took a small job at the local college and with the wages I earned we
went on our first holiday in years. Getting out the house and feeling
like I had a normal life, slowly I started to recover, although it
took about 2 years in full for the anxiety and OCD to completely
simmer down. I was worried because I had no job experience in the
subject I had graduated in and didn’t know how to explain to employers
what I had been doing all this time, so I was convinced I wouldn’t get
a job in the field I wanted anymore. After all my studying and
ambition I was devastated I had wasted my twenties, alienating my
friends, having no money to do the travelling I wanted and looking
lazy on my CV.

“My friend is still in Forever and becoming increasinly unhinged…”

It’s now a few years later, and my heart goes out to those in MLMs. My
friend is still in Forever and is becoming increasingly unhinged
(whenever I see her, which is rare, she seems to start screaming or
crying about something and is very controlling of those she knows,
despite her life looking successful, luxurious and happy on social
media). She is retraining to be a life coach. My cousin, who joined
Forever initially with no success, has been in about 4 different MLMs.
Before all this she started off trying to get her own business in
accounting set up, which had been going well, and stopped that for
success in MLM, which has still never come. If you saw any of these
people on Facebook you’d think they were rich and happy with loads of
friends and not a care in the world, but I know they are struggling
desperately with money and spend all day inside the house, alone,
working on their ‘mindset’ and making the perfect posts for social
media, which never get any interaction.

If only I could go back in time and get a full-time job straight out
of uni, but at last I’m here now (yes, in the industry I always
wanted- turns out my detour into MLM didn’t affect my employment
prospects as much as I dreaded as luckily people seem to assume I was
just travelling and taking it easy in my early twenties- thank god
they don’t know I was actually being brainwashed). I took about a 6
year detour until I had the confidence to go for my ideal job and now
I’m where I should be. Don’t get sucked in to the hype, if you want a
great life go for your dream career at last or set up your own
business yourself and you’ll make it with far less money and time you
would have wasted in an MLM.

*

Wow.  What a powerful and enraging story.  Thank you so much for sharing with us.

DO THEY KNOW? Do you think the top MLM reps know what they’re doing when they suck others into their team?

It’s the question we often ask ourselves at TVHQ and it’s been the source of some heated debates. 

Do the uplines, the top bots, the high-flyers in MLM, know what they’re doing when they pull people into their downline?  Do they know that most will fail?   Or are they brainwashed?  Trapped? Or sociopaths?

 

For those who are knew to MLM/this blog, some explanation.  MLM = multi-level marketing, like Younique, Forever Living, etc.

Upline = persons higher up in the pyramid, who generally appear to have lots of money, large teams, etc

Downline = the people below the upline.

 

As we’ve seen here, some MLM success-stories do work it out fairly quickly and leave because they can’t bear to see people they care about getting hurt.  Their moral compass, their emotional intelligence forces them to go before too much damage is done.  They realise that for most people MLM is a losing proposition.

And the others?  WATCH THIS:

 

Having watched the vido, do you think Emma, the top bot living in a castle, is lying?

Or is she convinced that she’s doing the right thing, using ‘attraction marketing’ to draw others into her MLM?  That she can help others get this dreamlife too?

And her brother – is he lying too, or does he truly believe that MLM is just another way of doing business?  To me, he looks sincere.

The question of Emma’s guilt or innocence, awareness or lack of, has been discussed  by those of us behind TV, along with other top bots.   Some of us believe she knows what she’s doing and is deliberately manipulating people.  Others think she is completely brainwashed and a victim.

The thing is, if Emma is doing everything she’s supposed to do: listening to ‘mindset’tapes all the time, constantly training and reaching out to others to bring them in, while balancing her family,  it’s possible that she DOES believe that what she is doing is right.  MLMs ban what they call ‘negative’ thinking.  Read this. And this.

This kind of thought-stopping tactic is also found in certain religions like Scientology.  An excellent blog to read about Scientology  is this one

Botwatch also wrote a well-researched post about MLM thinking here

Due to the high-turnover of recruits, all uplines have to spend a lot of time focussed on recruiting, which doesn’t give them a lot of time to reflect on what they are doing.   It’s an eternal sad hamster wheel of victims in, victims out.   As we discussed here, it can be very difficult to leave an MLM once a certain amount of time and money is invested.  That’s why we’ve always tried to reach out to the successes as well as those who have been used – in some cases, we think they are victims too.

Some, but not all.

There are also those who we have strong reason to believe know what they are doing and don’t care.  We will have more to come on this story, but for now, here’s an excellent blog about how to tell when people are lying.

How do you know whether you are good at spotting liars? Test yourself  here at the University of Berkeley’s EQ test website.  This test will tell you how clever you are at reading other people’s emotions, which is part of lie detection.

Many MLM uplines post videos on Facebook etc to persuade people to join, to mentor their ‘teams’, etc etc blah blah.  Next time you watch one, take note of whether their facial expressions match what they are saying, whether their smiles are truly sincere, and whether they show true emotional concern for their ‘teams’.   I’m not just talking words here – they should be showing genuine emotion/concern on their faces if they truly care.

People who lack emotion can sometimes appear very charming, smiling a lot, presenting a beautiful appearance, but will also show inappropriate facial expressions at times.   Take note of this.   It’s a red flag about how that person is truly feeling.

And finally, if you are high up in an MLM but want to get out, we ARE here for you.  No matter what you’ve done in MLM, you can make a difference right now, today, by leaving & helping others see through the deception.

PART 3: An Arbonne seller asks our informer to use her NHS position to convince women to join. She also offers to pay for it. Read on…

 

A few weeks ago I got to see from the other side an example of how some of these MLM people tick.

I work part time in the NHS and two days of my week are spent working in private practice.

I was approached by an Arbonne seller.

She would be classed as a success in Arbonne terms as she has the White Mercedes (no doubt paid for on a month by month basis until the day she misses her targets).  She is a friend of a friend, she know what I do but doesn’t know my opinions on what she does, in fact as far as she’s concerned I don’t know anything about her.

 

Her proposal was that if I could make them see the light through psychological means (I think she had the idea that I practise some sort of mind control) then we could split the difference on what we charged them for me seeing them.  She proposed we charged them £80 for the hour, I keep £60 and she have £20.

 

She came to me with a proposal saying that she had a training company that teaches women (ah, that demographic again) to have the confidence to take up opportunities (clearly not quite true).  She was finding that some of them ‘really need a confidence boost’ and how would I feel about her referring some of them to me?

Her proposal was that if I could make them see the light through psychological means (I think she had the idea that I practise some sort of mind control) then we could split the difference on what we charged them for me seeing them.  She proposed we charged them £80 for the hour, I keep £60 and she have £20.

This could be sold as therapy ‘because you really need to sort yourself out’ (but would be carefully modelled coercion).  ‘I can pass lots of work your way’ she told me.

 

She said that the emphasis was to help them to sell this opportunity on to other people as an exercise in ’empowerment’.

 

I asked her what she expected me to do exactly and what exactly was the goal?  Basically, she wanted me to manage away any rational questioning about joining Arbonne and to use an aggressive and didactic argument to get them to sign on the dotted line.

She wanted to give me a tight script full of persuasion and counter argument to any doubts.  She wanted me to use my position as a psychotherapist (and she was keen to flag my NHS status too) to basically bully people to join Arbonne by using her crib sheet of false promises and keep them in the system under pressure by using a particular form of victim blaming, ‘tell me, what is your particular negative self talk that means you could walk away from this really amazing chance?’.

She said that the emphasis was to help them to sell this opportunity on to other people as an exercise in ’empowerment’.  I asked her what would happen if it was clear to me that someone was not in a position to take part because they were emotionally vulnerable.

She felt that this was an ideal exploitable area in that we could demonstrate the great positive hope they would gain by joining up and any depression or anxiety could be used to our advantage.  The more vulnerable the better.

 

This was totally unethical, outside the ethics of the professional body the governs my work and something I would never ever entertain.  I have yet to respond to her but I will and I doubt she’ll be happy to hear my thoughts.  What it did do is confirm all of my beliefs about the real danger these schemes pose to many people but particularly women.  This isn’t empowerment, it’s deceitful fraud and whatever these schemes say about the ethical standards they insist upon, it’s very clear they encourage something something very different at ground level.

The End.

This is why we need real data about the effect multi-level marketing, network-marketing, social selling, whatever the fuck-schemes have on communities. This is why. 

Studies by Direct Sales Associations will claim these schemes create money for communities, but is that really true?  What is the true impact? No one knows.  Maybe it’s time we found out.

 

 

Is MLM training hypnotizing you? Read this.

“Mindset training” and “NLP” (neuro-linguistic programming) have been mentioned in many of our posts about MLM.  As we’ve covered previously, these are business and sales tools – ‘soft skills’ – that are not bad in and of themselves, but could be used for less than ethical purposes.  We loved Rebecca’s post about Mindset and MLM so, as she is a Mindset Coach herself, we decided to contact her and ask her a few questions about NLP & Mindset training.  Her website is here.

 

What is NLP/Mindset training?

 

Firstly, THEY are two different things.

 

NLP, neuro-linguistic programming, stems from studies aiming to demystify the art and science of excellence. The creators of NLP looked at a selection of very successful people who communicated, and studied what they all had in common. How do they communicate, where do they place their focus, how do they learn, how do they build relationships? From there they developed a series of surprisingly simple techniques to help us model the findings.

 

Mindset training or coaching looks at the beliefs you have about yourself and works on changing them until you are better able to reach your full potential. I describe it as getting your mind to work for you rather than against you, understanding that we have more choices than we are led to believe we have, that our intelligence and opportunities are not fixed. Basically I see mindset as empowering, removing limiting beliefs, and so handing back a whole lot of choice and control to my clients. The concept of mindset comes from the work of Carol Dweck, who researched what she called growth and fixed mindset.

 

However, I find that mindset has become a bit of a buzzword and I explain in the piece you linked to its limitations, especially in relation to MLM.  Read that piece here.

 

How do you learn it? 
 
Like anything else – you can buy books, training courses, study for qualifications if you like in NLP. And practice makes perfect.

 

Mindset is a little more “new”. I would advise starting by reading Carol Dweck’s book on the subject.
 

 

Can anyone learn it?

 

Yes, both mindset work and NLP techniques are beautifully simple.
I could confidently teach you a couple of techniques or concepts of each in a very short period of time.

 

How do people use it in sales?

 

NLP techniques can be used in many circumstances – as a coach I use it to help people communicate more confidently and also to reduce certain anxieties. I use the techniques more though as a way of helping me be a better coach – my NLP skills help me build rapport up with my clients and also help me “read” my clients more effectively – I can listen to what they say and what they don’t say in order to get a deeper understanding of where their issues lie.

 

NLP techniques are also used in sales, by most sales people whether they know it or not. Skilled users of NLP are able to quickly build up a rapport with almost anyone – and we buy from people we like. A sales person can also use NLP techniques to create pleasant associations with their products or services, tapping into what they pick up the client is looking for. Have you ever had a salesperson encourage you to visualise driving the car they are selling you, going into great detail? Or someone selling you a house inviting you to imagine yourself living there, painting you a picture of your new life? That’s NLP.

 

Skilled sales people also place themselves in a position of authority. Very subtley they will tip the balance of power in a conversation to favour them, and reduce the objections the client may have. They will pace and lead the conversation, rather than allowing the client to be in control. This sounds very sneaky, but most people who sell do this to a certain extent. But it is a skill which can be honed and perfected, making your selling irresistable. And NLP can help a salesperson get that skill.

 

Finally, for the purposes of this interview, the choice of language used in a sales pitch is really important. Sales “scripts” are developed by experts, paying great attention to the words used. In NLP we talk about “magic words”. There are also what we call “embedded commands”, which you probably won’t notice as being a command when you hear them, but they are designed to tap into your unconscious mind. Do you want an example? Don’t think about singing dancing crocodiles. (Did you just visualise a crocodile chorus?)

 

If we up the NLP skill level a little bit we can move on to the hypnotic use of language and tone. Have you ever found yourself almost zoning out during a sales pitch? Highly skilled users of NLP will repeat certain words or phrases, use specific key words and phrases repeatedly across the pitch and will speed up and slow down the speed at which they speak, changing the tone of their voice as they do it. In short, if you ever feel you have been hypnotised by a sales pitch then you aren’t going completely mad. They haven’t actually hypnotised you, or at least I hope not, but they have used certain techniques that hypnotists do use.

 

What about on video?

 

Yes, I would say that NLP techniques can be used on video. Perhaps not to the same effect as in person, as when watching a video it is easy to get distracted, or pause and come back to it.

 

Is there any certification required by government before you can use it?

 

No. Anyone can use NLP. When I was trained to use NLP I was also taught about the ethics surrounding it. Think of it as a scalpel – a tool that can be used to heal as well as harm. I don’t believe government regulation would be a good idea, and it certainly couldn’t be enforced. I would guess that any one of us use something that could be interpreted as NLP on a regular basis. Anyone that has any notion of sales, or who is naturally skilled at influencing others are most likely using something that could be described as NLP.

 

Using NLP in sales isn’t necessarily bad either – we have to be allowed to sell our products or services. It is when NLP is used to harm, to exert undue influence or to manipulate people that we step into a grey area. If I used NLP techniques to sell you a dodgy car or to recruit you into a Ponzi scheme, that would be unethical.

 

 

Yes, I think it is possible she felt as though she had been hypnotised but I doubt she was actually hypnotised. As I mentioned above some NLP techniques are based on hypnosis techniques (and vice versa) so a slight feeling of zoning out may have been linked to NLP. Perhaps the trainer used a specific tone of voice, or repeated certain phrases.

From what I know of hypnosis you need to be receptive to it, so I doubt you would unwillingly be hypnotised by a video. I am not saying it is impossible, but I think it is unlikely in this case.

 

 Thanks Rebecca, that’s very interesting.

 

“It was when my son said the way I was talking was like a cult that I came to my senses” – a new ex FL Bot speaks.

 

I had been told of the benefits for allergies for animals and was looking for a natural way to help my dog

 

1story

 

The more training videos I was watching the more I wanted to watch them

 

2story

 

After my son had mentioned ‘cult’ I started to think about how I was feeling and could only relate it to when I had hypnotherapy years ago

 

3story

 

I’ve lost £400 in 3-4 weeks

 

4story

 

I am a nurse, middle-aged and consider myself to be a pretty strong character but I got pulled into something that certainly is not a business opportunity and in my opinion is a cult type organisation.

 

5story

 

A note about neuro-linguistic programming.  It’s a good tool and can really help people with issues they may need to work through, but like any tool, it can be used unethically in the wrong hands.  Ethical users of hypnosis and NLP would always seek a person’s permission before putting them into such a state.   Unethical users will not.

Please also read the excellent post about Mind Set training here: We love this blog about Mindset Training (and also MLMs). Please Read.

FYI: We have also received a huge dump of FL training documents from an informer, including information used by FL bots to sell products to pet and animal owners, as well as veterinarians.  Stay tuned huns xxx

We love this blog about Mindset Training (and also MLMs). Please Read.

When Mindset Isn’t Everything

“Now I see it’s like brainwashing” – final thoughts from our informer

 

15alisa

WATCH THIS:

Here’s a video about Emma Cooper we made

Also, read this, and this, and and this.

There was intense pressure put on our informer to go to every “Success” event.   Normally, the bot is expected to pay for tickets to the event, the cost of petrol, acommodation etc. etc. etc.  We suspect that these events are another source of income for the MLMs.

 

successdaypressure

 

The screenshot below was sent to us by another member of an FB group.

 

businesspresentationedit

 

Let’s look at that again:

 

bpdetail

 

Her business didn’t move not because she wasn’t working hard enough (she was), and not because there were too many other people flogging the same shite  products in her area (there were), or because no one wanted to buy the her stuff cos they could get something similar at Holland & Barrett for 50p (they can)…

no….

It’s cos her mindset wasn’t right, see?

Interesting isn’t it.

How they convince you it’s all up to what’s in your ‘mind’.

And the only cure for your mindset? Go to EVERY BP, every “success” meeting, every (insert name of random event they put on and say you have to go here), read every book, watch every DVD….

Therefore, if you fail at making Diamond Manager= your mind did it to you cos you didn’t go to enough events that you must pay for.

Interesting and very, very clever.

More on “mindset” training and how it is misused & abused  by MLMs to come.  Keep checking huns! xo xoxo