How Mormons, network marketing & social media combine to sell women a false dream

 

I’ve been trying to write this post for months now, but every time I’d get close I felt like the subject matter – women, mothers, feminism, multi-level marketing was so huge and amorphous that I’d give up, defeated, not knowing where to start.  So,  I was pathetically grateful when Kate Dyson of The Motherload agreed to join me in tackling this subject and wrote her post, “Is Network Marketing a Cult for Mums”.   You can read it here.  Between the two of us, we’ve tried to split the issue up into the most important parts that we think need to be highlighted.

 

I remember when my daughter was first born.  Up until then, she’d been an abstract idea in my mind, not quite real.  Then she was born, and I fell in love with her.   For the first years of her life I decided I wanted to be with her as much as possible, helped by the fact I couldn’t earn enough money to pay for childcare and a heap of hormones.    I did other things: worked part time in a shop, wrote a screenplay, to make money where I could.

 

It became clear very quickly that if you’re a woman who wants to stay home with your kids that not many mainstream political or activist groups will support you.   That choice makes you a ‘traditional’ woman (even if you’re not) – I’m not, and I felt no similarities between why I wanted to stay home and why the conservative religious groups who appeared to support women like me thought I should.  You don’t speak for me, I’d think. I WANT to earn my own money.   But most feminist-oriented groups supported better childcare not the option to stay home.   Which left me and many women like me in a bind.  We needed to invent our own ways.

 

So, we did.  Many of my friends became “mumpreneurs’ and tried to start businesses that fit in around their kids, with varying levels of success. Others gave up and went back to their jobs, signing their children onto endless childcare waitlists and in some cases, having to accept sub-standard care.  For the rest of us, the only money-making ‘opportunities’ that seemed flexible & available to women like us were in pyramid form: Stella & Dot, Younique, LulaRoe, or many others.

 

I was invited to a Stella & Dot party and out of obligation bought a necklace.  I went through a huge Stella & Dot phase.  “It’s to help out (insert name of fellow SAHM here)” I told my husband, convincing myself I was doing a good deed, helping a fellow Mum make money while staying home with her kids.  Really, I just liked spending money and getting out of the house.  However, like a lot of MLM products, the expensive jewellery didn’t live up to the hype.  Within weeks something I’d paid 100 dollars for was chipping and flaking.  For the first time I wondered how legit this ‘business’ really was.   I’d been told the jewellery was of high quality, but it clearly wasn’t.

 

Before long my SAHM friends were bailing on Stella & Dot and moving onto another MLM, a pattern that turned out to be typical.  One of them hounded me for weeks to have a party for my friends – I thought about it but something about the way she talked put me off.  I now know, thanks to the stories and research we’ve done in Timeless Vie, that her approach was scripted – she claimed she only had a certain number of ‘spots available’ and I had to book now to ensure she was available.  This pressure tactic, I have learned, is typical of MLM bots.  They don’t want to give you too much time to think.  Not long after I backed out I learned she had dropped out.  I still hope she didn’t lose too much money.  She had 3 kids.

 

The more we’ve learned about MLM, the darker it is, and the harder it is not to come to the conclusion that the whole thing is deliberate: the targeting of mothers, the refusal to investigate the industry by government, the smoke & mirrors that make it so difficult to find out how much women ACTUALLY earn.

 

WE NEED TO TALK ABOUT THE MORMONS.

 

I really, really, REALLY don’t want to talk about the Mormons.

It’s not an anti-religious thing for me.  I really could not care less what or who people worship.

But when it’s obvious many MLMs are set up in Utah and run by people who appear to be devout Mormons well then WE NEED TO TALK ABOUT THIS.  It is time to talk about the massive, Mormon-shaped elephant in the room.

 

First, let’s start with this: that there are so many MLM companies in Utah that they have started their OWN “Direct Sales Association”.  Some of our fave MLMs like Younique, Maelle & Ariix have won awards there.

 

These MLMs talk the language of female empowerment, of spiritual enlightenment, but are they really interested in empowering women?  For a start, there’s the Mormon religion itself.   We discussed this previously here in a blog about the founders of Younique.  First, a note: I do not claim to know how all Mormons believe or feel, because like any religious community I’m sure there’s a wide range of belief and faith.

 

That said, there are very clear, very traditional gender roles encouraged in the Mormon church, and arguably that’s part of the reason why MLMs are so encouraged – because they allow women to ‘stay home’ in their traditional roles while appearing to be ‘making money’.    I say “appearing to be” deliberately because there is very little independent data to prove they actually ARE making money.

 

It’s not like the IMF (the International Monetary Fund) is screaming from the rooftops about how amazing MLM companies are for women.  They’re not.  They think we need better childcare, they think that women are suffering from economic inequality, and they think these issues are ECONOMIC issues that are holding everyone back.  If the founders of MLMs want to empower women economically, why don’t they join hands with labour groups, feminist groups, etc to fight for better childcare? More flexible jobs? You know why.

 

The other thing? One of the questions we have is where all the money is going and whether it’s going to fund the LDS churches’ political activities, many of which might be opposed to the economic empowerment of women outside of traditional gender roles.

 

THE EMPOWERED YOUNIQUE PRESENTERS OF STOKE-ON-TRENT

 

Let’s take Younique as an example.  Younique aims to validate, empower, and uplift women.  Maybe they do, but again, there’s no real data to prove this claim one way or the other.  So I decided to have a crack at it.

 

I don’t have a lot of time, I work and have a family,  so I decided to work with what is publically available.  The rest of the TV team suggested I  concentrate on a part of the UK that’s more economically deprived and appears to have a large number of MLM schemes in operation: Stoke-on-Trent.   Stoke-on-Trent has a pretty high number of people on benefits and a very high number of people who have been forced to declare bankruptcy, compared to the rest of the UK.

 

THE DATA

 

Using Younique’s presenter map, I worked out roughly how many Younique presenters there were in the area.  Note: since “Stoke-on-Trent” doesn’t have clear boundaries on the Younique map I just picked out women roughly in and around Stoke.

 

Total number of Younique bots: 52.   Of these, 2 were Green Status (elite), 4 were Pink, 13 were Yellow, and 33 were White, the lowest status.

 

To maintain White Status, a presenter has to generate $125 USD every 3 months in “personal retail sales” to stay active.   125 USD according to the Travelex Currency exchange website on 22 April 2017 is £88.88.  For Yellow Status a presenter must have generated $1000 USD, which = £711 pounds.   For pink, it’s all that plus £177.75 PLUS sponsoring 1 white status presenter.   For Green it’s £355.50 plus sponsoring 3 white status presenters.  Note: there’s much more to the plan than this, this is just the basics. Note: “sponsoring” = “recruiting” women into their team.   We made a video about that here:

 

https://www.facebook.com/plugins/video.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2Ftimelessvie%2Fvideos%2F1725687821035572%2F&show_text=0&width=400“>Younique Recruiting Video

 

All the Younique Presenters are women.

All can recruit or sell from anywhere.

Most of them were White Status, which is the lowest status at the bottom of the triangle.

 

Here’s how Younique’s empowerment plan was working:

 

I figured out the total amount paid into Younique by the 52 presenters came to at least £17,186.04.  That includes £69 for the presenter kit.  Reminder: this is in a deprived area.  We can’t be sure where much of this money is going, or how much of it is from presenters themselves rather than actual sales,  but we are fairly sure much of the money flowing OUT of Stoke-on-Trent to people higher up the Younique compensation plan.

 

The total amount paid by White Status presenters for starter kits is: £2277.  To stay active for 3 months it’s £2933.04 for a total of £5210.04.  I decided to concentrate on White Status presenters as they are a. the most common and b. the ‘bottom’ of the MLM triangle so more representative of a typical rep.

 

Then, I searched up each presenter on Facebook to see what I could discover about their success or failure from social media.  Blank spaces mean I couldn’t find any info.

 

Presenter Name Starter Kit minium £ to stay active Comments Extra Comments
Presenter 1 69 88.88
Presenter 2 69 88.88
Presenter 3 69 88.88 downline to StokeonTrent Yellow Status presenter, does not appear to be active
Presenter 4 69 88.88
Presenter 5 69 88.88
Presenter 6 69 88.88
Presenter 7 69 88.88
Presenter 8 69 88.88 Has younique FB profile (Presenter 8 younique) with 184 friends. Very few likes or responses.  All the likes are from other younique presenters in other countries.
Presenter 9 69 88.88
Presenter 10 69 88.88
Presenter 11 69 88.88 friends with Stokeontrent Green Status Presenter.  Has a facebook group called Presenter11makeup by younique with 154 members.  Seems to be recruiting etc back in Poland.  Runs raffles to get rid of makeup.  She sells raffle tickets for 2 pounds each to people saying they can ‘win’ 100 pounds of younique makeup.   For one raffle she sold 8 tickets = 16 pounds which means a loss of 70 pounds on the makeup.
Presenter 12 69 88.88
Presenter 13 69 88.88 has FB group with 16 members.  Shows Younique Makeup as “free” then a link to her online shopping party.  No response, though 8 people have seen it.  No responses or likes to any of her posts.
Presenter 14 69 88.88 has fb page with 18 likes. Endless posts, no comments likes or shares.
Presenter 15 69 88.88
Presenter 16 69 88.88
Presenter 17 69 88.88 friends with elite green status younique member
Presenter 18 69 88.88 has FB page with 13 likes.  Also has a closed group with 65 members for younique selling
Presenter 19 69 88.88
Presenter 20 69 88.88
Presenter 21 69 88.88 Presenter 21 had an online party and made 151.00 pts.  The only contributor to the party was Presenter 21.  At this level Presenter 21 wouldn’t have made any money at all as party points don’t count until 200 pt. Has been trying to recruit since Jan 2017, no takers, no likes on her posts etc.  on FB.   Has a FB page with 21 likes.  Posting about 79 pound younique products with no likes or takers.  Lives and videos with only a few views.  Has been trying to get to yellow status since she re-joined in January, still hasn’t managed it, still posting up a storm in April. 2x 102 pounds to stay active = 204 pounds she’s spent to stay in at LEAST.
Presenter 22 69 88.88
Presenter 23 69 88.88
Presenter 24 69 88.88 has facebook page, 40 people have liked it.  Attempts to recruit etc. no response.
Presenter 25 69 88.88
Presenter 26 69 88.88
Presenter 27 69 88.88 14 likes of her page.  Last post asked people to comment if they wanted a free liquid foundation.  No one commented.  She had an online party and made 44.00 pts, which means she would have made nothing.  The only person who contributed was Presenter 27 – herself.  Has been active since at least feb.
Presenter 28 69 88.88
Presenter 29 69 88.88 had a younique kudos party, made 144.00 pts, which is not enough to have received rewards.  The only contributor (buyer)was the Presenter herself.  She had other parties with the following results: party 2: 177.00 pts contributor: Presenter 29.
Presenter 30 69 88.88 just made yellow status.  50 likes of FB page. Posts regularly, the only likes are from herself and another white status younique presenter.  Naturally beautiful Yellow status means has generated at least £711
Presenter 31 69 88.88
Presenter 32 69 88.88
Presenter 33 69 88.88 likes Sharlie Melly, a black status elite presenter living in Spain.   Trying to sell younique on her personal FB page. No comments or likes. Started in august 2014 and still only white presenter.
totals 2277 2933.04

 

I think this table speaks for itself.

Question: Does a struggling area like Stoke really need 52 Younique sellers?

 

Even if the women try to recruit and sell to other areas that aren’t doing as badly, they’re still competing against all the women already doing the same thing in those areas.  This seems like a pretty impossible, not very empowering task.  Even Younique admits this in teeny tiny letters on their website.

 

From Younique:

The recruitment and sales figures posted here are achieved only by approximately less than the top 0.02 % of Presenters.

There is no guarantee of success for any Younique Presenter. The final success or failure of any Younique Presenter will likely be a function of such Presenter’s individual talents and effort as well as factors outside of the Presenter’s control such as luck and macro-economic conditions. (like living in a poorer area called Stoke-On-Trent – Timeless Vie).  Younique makes no guarantee, promise or any representation that a Presenter will obtain success, profit or income. Becoming a Younique Presenter involves business and financial risk. It is possible that a Presenter will lose money in conjunction with participating as a Presenter.

 

And there you have it, in black and white, from Younique themselves.   But this is not the dream sold to women trying to stay home or make extra money around their families.  This fact is hidden under layer after layer of memes, tweets, and other social media guff about how amazing the Younique opportunity is.

 

I believe, like Kate Dyson, that network marketing has fuck all to do with empowering women and everything to do with selling them a load of bollocks so they part with their money.   Women spending their time, energy & talents on network marketing schemes don’t have the time, money or energy to push for better childcare, better work status, or their own businesses.  I would argue that MLMs funnel a lot of women’s talent away from economic empowerment towards endlessly striving for an impossible goal.  0.02%, people.  0.02% chance she’ll hit the top of that Younique leaderboard.  It’s a game.  It’s pay-to-play.  Like gambling.

 

Since I founded Timeless Vie, we’ve received PM after PM from women desperate to tell us their stories of exploitation in MLM.  Their side is often ignored.  It shouldn’t be.

Because of them, we’ve started our MLM-free logo campaign, which the Motherload, Mrs Gloss & the Goss & WorcestershireMums have joined so far (along with others).

 

We will continue to fight for more transparency from the MLM industry and more independent data about the true outcomes for women.

VALENTUS. We give you the skinny on this allegedly ‘skinny’ coffee.

The Ugly Decaffeinated Truth

 

 

Most of us by now will have had the misfortune to encounter one or two of the Valentus crew.  Goals are being #smashed, promotions #nailed, babes being #boss.  Although allegedly in ‘pre-launch’, the product is out there and teams are growing at an enormous and frankly frightening & unsustainable rate.  So we thought it was time to take a good look at Valentus – at the company, the product and the compensation plan and to try to get to the truth behind the over-excited Facebook ‘lives’, the ‘Double Diamond’ promotions, the blurred-out bonuses and the TOTES AMAZEBALLS weight loss products.

 

Let’s start with the Company:

 

It launched in 2014 and the CEO is Dave Jordan, a network marketing veteran who has clearly honed his skills in a number of MLMs, usually moving on to the next just before companies have folded.  Timing is everything, people!  Dave is a expert in lead-generation and recruitment tactics, which is why it is hardly surprising that Valentus is all about recruitment.  Bots talk about Valentus being an ‘established, global business’ but facts about the real size & reach of the business seem pretty hard to find.

 

 

The Product:

 

The star in the Valentus universe is the Prevail SlimRoast Coffee.  It’s a coffee that you drink to make you lose weight.  Cards-on-the-table time: I loathe weight-loss gimmicks like this.  MLMs deliberately target the things most women are socially conditioned to want most of all: friendship, health, beauty and most of all, weight-loss.  Almost every MLM has some kind of weight-loss programme that they use as a hook.  These are generally unproven, short-term, unsustainable & unhealthy, both for the mind and for the body.  And yet we want to believe that just by sipping a cup of magic coffee every day we will miraculously turn into Kate Moss and be so much happier and more valued as a human being.  Anyone selling these kind of false promises and trading on the pressure women are already under to look thinner/younger/more beautiful deserves a special place in feminist hell.

 

Anyway, having got that off my chest, let’s look at the SlimRoast claims & reality.  Here’s the Valentus claim:

 

Formulated with natural appetite suppressants, feel good ingredients and detox components SlimROAST is a great addition to your weight management program. Not only will you find managing your weight with SlimROAST will produce exciting results, but you will love the taste of this delicious Italian dark roast coffee.

 

Now let’s turn to a qualified Nutritionist to debunk some of that.  It’s worth reading all of Abby Langer’s review as she tears the claims to shreds (https://abbylangernutrition.com/slimroast/) but here’s a few highlights:

 

 

Valentus SlimRoast has zero research proving it works. Testimonials don’t count.

 

SlimRoast contains mostly unproven ingredients that likely don’t work – together, or separately – to promote weight loss.

 

It’s pretty physiologically impossible to take a supplement and lose weight just from that, without any changes to your diet or activity. So testimonials that make that claim are probably not legit. I promise – when scientists find the magic ingredient that makes people lose weight while they sit on their ass, I’ll let you know. For now though – you’ll need to do the work. Sorry!

 

Compensation Package:

 

‘Eeeeeek!  It’s the best compensation package of any MLM EVER!’

 

Claims like this combined with blurred-out photos of allegedly ENORMOUS 5 & 6-figure incomes certainly implies that within a very short space of time you will be raking in the money.

 

Here’s the nasty truth.  Once again, it’s all about recruitment and about the bot being the customer.

 

  1. Success depends on bots committing to a monthly auto-shipment of product and in turn recruiting others to do likewise
  2. You cannot progress without signing up to automatically buy over £100 worth of product per month and building a team of other people doing likewise.
  3. You also get paid an additional commission bonus for every new member you sign up
  4. There is minimal information about retailing on the Valentus website and little reward for retailing in the compensation plan. It’s all about autoship and recruitment.

 

Massive red flags here: this emphasis on autoship/recruitment places Valentus on very rocky ground.  In fact, people have analysed the Valentus compensation structure and found it almost identical to Vemma’s – that’s right, the ‘Energy Drink’ MLM that was condemned as a pyramid scheme by the FTC because of its emphasis on recruitment/autoship.  Bar a small handful at the top, most affiliates lost money in Vemma.  Read this for more information on the Vemma case: https://www.ftc.gov/news-events/press-releases/2015/08/ftc-acts-halt-vemma-alleged-pyramid-scheme

 

Conclusion:

 

Stay away.  Don’t touch with a 10-foot pole.

 

This is a pyramid scheme with very little pretense to even try to dress it up with product & retail.  It’s growing rapidly in the UK right now but unless you are one of the top bots, you’ll be paying in your £100 per month and losing money (but not the promised weight!).

 

If you need proof that is a pyramid scheme, we have a recording of one of the top UK bots in a Facebook Live actually stating that you don’t need to sell product at all to succeed.  This is illegal.  This makes Valentus a full-on, undeniable pyramid scheme.  Like all such schemes, one of two things will happen:

 

  1. The authorities will catch up with Valentus, fine it and shut it down.
  2. The scheme will collapse.

 

Either of those end-games are bad news for 95% of scheme members.  They will lose their money.  And those at the top who are boasting about their wealth and recruiting more people in everyday are both immoral and –  in some cases – breaking the law.

 

We’re watching you, Valentus.

“But why aren’t you balanced? What about all the positive stories about incredibly rich (insert name here) MLMers?” In this post, we explain why ‘balance’ is bullshit when it comes to network marketing, and so is attempting to be unbiased.

We get it regularly.

However I do worry that it (Timeless Vie) doesn’t provide a balanced view; there are no positive stories.

comment

On the face of it, that seems a completely reasonable point.

That’s what proper journalists would do, right?

They’d have the sad story and then the happy story so you, the reader, got both sides of the issue.   And what would you think? You’d probably think there’s a 50% chance you could be wealthy in an MLM, and a 50% chance you’d fail.   Fair.  Balanced.

Except….acccording to this study, approximately 99% of people lose money.

If most people lose money, is it really fair and balanced to have 1 story for and 1 against?  Wouldn’t a really balanced piece of writing about MLMs have 99 stories of failure vs 1 story of success?  Wouldn’t that be more accurate?  And wouldn’t a really balanced piece point out that the 1 person who succeeded did so because of all the people that failed?

The idea of ‘false balance’ in journalism has been around for a while, but none of us connected the issue to the debate over MLM until one of us talked to a journalist in New Zealand.  He was interested in what we were doing, and the feminist stance we were taking, and he pointed out that ‘false balance’ could be a problem when it came to issues like MLM.   Read this, about the climate change science and false balance.

And this.

The idea is this: that by presenting both sides of a story and giving each equal weight, journalists inadvertently give people the impression that both sides are equally valid.   They aren’t.

On one side, we have an industry that is making lots and lots of money by selling women false hope, that allows reps to make false health claims, that says one thing in public and another in private (we have so much evidence of this at this point it’s not funny), that in some cases refuses to divulge how much money women will really make, and is largely ignored by government.     For ‘positive’ stories you only have to go to the websites of the Direct Sales Association, Arbonne, Younique etc.

On the other side, there’s us.  We are making exactly zero money from doing this.  We have jobs, families, we do this in what spare time we have.    We’ve researched.  We’ve talked to victims.  We really care about them.  We’ve tried to get answers from the DSA, MLM companies and government, and have discovered that there’s a huge information gap about what effects MLMs really have.

If we were to do positive stories, we’d be giving our readers the impression we think MLM is a valid business model, when all evidence we’ve found so far indicates it’s not.  Would that really be the right thing to do?

This is why we don’t do “balanced” stories about MLM.

Because what matters is the truth.

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25k beauty-lovin’ women can’t be wrong: a Q&A with Julia Langton, the founder of Mrs Gloss & the Goss

Thank you so much for agreeing to talk to us.  We at TV are all big fans of your Facebook community ‘Mrs Gloss & The Goss’, home to over 20k makeup, fashion and beauty-loving women (and men) and its friendly, supportive, informative and entertaining content.

 

Mrs Gloss has a very strict no MLM policy.  Can you tell us how you became aware of MLMs and why you put the policy in place?

 

I first became aware of MLMs a couple of years ago. I could no longer shoehorn myself into my size 12s and I lamented this fact on FB. Next thing I know, I’m being inundated with kind offers of detoxes from Juice Plus and Forever Living reps. On a quick read through, I could see straightaway that the claims were a nonsense but I’m very aware that there are those who are less cynical by nature than me who’d be blown away by the talk of support and the promised results. 

 

When I set up Gloss, one of the very first guidelines was ‘ No MLM promotion’ and this was something I wanted in place to protect our members from spurious claims. 

 

 

The Mrs Gloss Facebook group has over 20k members who love hair, fashion, health and make up.  That must make it a magnet for MLM recruiters.  Do you find that they are employing devious tactics to get past your rules?

 

Gloss has approximately 25,000 members and I understand that this is a great temptation to MLM reps! There’s a huge audience there and they all have one thing in common – a love of beauty, so yes, it’s a bit of a Mecca for reps. We are all very switched in the admin team and our first ‘line of defence’ is to check potential new members profiles, and yes, we really DO check each one. This is despite receiving up to 200 requests to join Gloss a day.  This is a relatively recent thing though, and some will and do slip through the net. The check itself is cursory, but we have a scan through and if we see any hint of MLM, we block the request. Some may argue that how do we know that this potential new member, who just so happens to sell Arbonne for example, will attempt to sell in the group? We don’t of course, but our experience shows us otherwise. The reps themselves can be very devious, we have some who will not mention their products but post a photo captioned ‘do you like my make up today?’ and of course, members will say they love it and ask what products were used. Some of the more wily reps won’t say but they’ll be storing away all of the members names who have complimented them and yes, they’ll then friend request them or send them an unsolicited message, both of which are against our guidelines. This is why we regularly ask members to drop the admin team a line if they receive anything unsolicited. It really does take us just a moment to check. We also ask our members to hit the report button if they see a MLM product being recommended in Gloss. If the person mentioning it is a seller, they are immediately removed and blocked. If they’re not, we politely point them in the direction of our guidelines and keep an eye out for future. 

 

 

Whenever we have seen posts on Mrs Gloss complaining about MLMs, they always seem to have a lot of supportive comments! Do your members welcome the fact that your community is an MLM-free space online?

 

Yes, our members LOVE the fact that we are a MLM free zone. They know that they are free to ask for recommendations without fear of being hounded by people trying to sell them tat products with an agenda or recruit them. 

 

 

One thing that always strikes us about Mrs Gloss is that the women (and men) are very respectful and supportive of one another.  MLMs use the word ‘empowering’ a lot but our research has shown that they really do the opposite! How do you maintain a kind, constructive atmosphere in your online community?

 

Gloss proves that you can have an empowering, uplifting and supportive environment without having to actually ever mention those words. We also do not share ‘motivational’ memes or pointless quotes. We achieve this by ensuring our members stay on topic at all times. This goes a long way in keeping the environment and tone relevant, accessible to all and fun. You won’t find people sharing deeply personal stories or wildly off topic subjects. You really can dip into Gloss at any time and find chat, advice and recommendations centred around beauty, Skincare, haircare and make up. We achieve this by removing anything that falls foul of our guidelines. If it’s something upsetting or personal that a members has shared, we always drop them a line explaining why we’ve removed it. Gloss really does work better when we stay true to what we do best. 

 

You personally must be a make-up and skin care lover.  We think we can guess the answer to this, but would you ever consider buying/using Forever/Arbonne/Younique/Maelle etc etc etc…  and if not, why not?

 

The reason I set up Gloss was to share my deep passion for all things beauty! I’m a HUGE fan of all things make up and skin care and this has been a life long passion of mine. I wouldn’t use a MLM product if I was paid to do so or given it for free – and this has happened many times! I obviously have some brave reps contacting me trying to change my mind. This hasn’t happened yet though ; ) 

 

As for why I wouldn’t use any of these products. I don’t care how good they may or may not be..when you have to rely on harassment, recruitment and exploiting women to sell your product, then I’m absolutely not interested 

 

Finally, if you knew someone who loved cosmetics/beauty and was considering joining one of the beauty MLMs, what advice would you give them?

 

My advice to someone who was considering joining a MLM company would be the following .. Do your research.  Make this research independent, not just listening to the ‘upline’ or those already flogging it, these people will have an agenda. Join Timeless Vie and ask questions. Ask yourself this… ‘do I REALLY believe that I can get rich by selling mascara/ face cream / capsules/ etc etc.’ Try and see through the faux positivity and hype..you really cannot make a living in your pyjamas, nursing a glass of wine and fondly gazing at your two year old*. Oh and join Gloss! That’s a given right? 

 

 

Julia, thank you so much for your time and your support of Timeless Vie. We’ll see you over on Mrs Gloss on FB, Twitter & Instagram!

 

*Just a reminder that independent research has repeatedly demonstrated that more than 90% of participants in MLM schemes lose money.  Do not believe reps claims about incomes and average earnings: these figures are exaggerated and do not include personal purchases, expenses, samples, catalogues and publicity materials or training (for which you will be charged).

READ THIS: Most Direct Sellers are women. We have the proof.

 

Assuming we can rely on Direct Sales’ Associations own data, that is.

 

united kingdom

 

We couldn’t find any stats on the UK DSA webpage but happily the EU DSA has them.

linky here

77% are women

UK

 

USA

 

USA DSA stats

US DSA

77.4% are women

USA

 

Australia

 

Australia DSA

 

75% are women

Australia

 

Canada

 

Canada DSA

 

91% are women

Canada

 

New Zealand

 

New Zealand DSA

 

69% are women

NewZealand

 

Still believe this isn’t a feminist issue?

Note: our campaign is against MLMs, NOT single-level direct sales companies.  However, most DSAs are made up of MLMs, hence our focus on their statistics.

We need a real, unbiased study that asks the tough questions: how much money do these female sellers, on average (don’t even start, top of the pyramid Shill Bots, we know you make money off your downlines)…. actually make in MLM, after expenses, success day tickets, etc?  No one really knows.  This is a huge number of women being potentially exploited.

 

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We introduce The Cwtch at Ffwrwm and Wool in the Woods, our second Real Independent business

 

And here it is – our second showcase of a real, independent, woman-owned business (or rather, cooperative).    We’re proud to introduce the woman behind these  2 businesses: “The Cwtch at Ffwrwm”  and “Wool in the Woods” – Sian.

The Cwtch at Ffwrwm is in the Roman village of Caerleon, South Wales.  It’s a gift shop selling Welsh, ethical, Fairtrade and local items.  If you are nearby or visiting, maybe pop in and say hi!

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Sian says: “I have been self-employed for around 8 years.  First as a bookkeeper so I could work from home when my children were young, and then I opened the shop.  I ran it for 2 years on my own but found working 7 days a week too much, so, I got together with 3 friends and we now run it between us”

Sian has a new venture with 2 other friends, Wool in the Woods.  They had their first stall at Wonderwool Wales in April selling crochet kits and haberdashery (my daughter would love this – Timeless vie).  As well as sales, these women also teach all aspects of crochet.  We love the beautiful wools they sell – they’re 100% Welsh in a gorgeous range of colours.  We can just imagine cosying up by a fire with a book and one of their scarves wrapped around us.

 

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an example of the products made by Wool in the Woods

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Please do share this post and let’s help these truly local small businesses get some love!

 

 

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Mummy Guilt-trip MLM Meme of the Week and why MLMs want you to feel guilty for working

Vom.  And more vom with a side dish of vom.

 

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The real issue here is that many women (and men) find it hard to get flexible work.   Maternity pay is not high enough for people to survive.  Instead of addressing these social issues, though, our governments would rather just pretend that MLM fulfils those needs.   They happy to stand back  and not look too hard:  at:  women being screwed over trying to make money rather than actually making money.  They are happy to keep pretending it’s all above board and legit.

MLMs know this.  We have been told by an informer they know it and they exploit it, deliberately.

From an informer:

 

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They (MLMs) are counting on typical workplaces & nurseries charging obscene fees to stop women from reaching their full potential…..& all too often they (women: Timeless Vie) get sucked into this pyramid/funnel/hellhole scheme.

 

We get it.  We’ve been new mothers ourselves.  We remember the rush of hormones, of love, all of it.   We’ve all felt the financial pressures, the love of work, the love of family, the insane busyness, the inner conflict.   But the answer is not MLM.  We deserve better.

Remember this next time you see a “mummy stay home and do MLM” meme, don’t feel guilty.  Feel the rage.   THe MLMs WANT you to feel bad, and they want your money.  They don’t actually want your workplace to change or for your mat leave pay to rise.  They don’t ACTUALLY care about women’s issues.   Don’t forget many MLMs are from very conservative religious communities like this one.

They want you to stay home and be someone’s good, obediant little downline.

(we have no issue with SAHMs, btw.  We’ve done it ourselves).

 

 

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More to come on why the UK (and many other) governments love to not look to closely at MLM.

#MLMisafeministissue. #MLMisasocialissue.